Langley’s The Master of Game

Langley’s The Master of Game

When Edward Langley, 2nd Duke of York, translated Gaston’s The Book of the Hunt (1389) into English in 1413, French was still the language of the Court and elsewhere. Whatever Edward had in mind, the translation the signaled the linguistic shift in English society,...
Gaston’s Book of the Hunt

Gaston’s Book of the Hunt

Gaston III, Count of Foix, was nicknamed Phoebus in recognition of his golden hair. He was a second-tier noble whose domain was Béarn, bordering the Pyrenees in southwestern France. Gaston was immensely rich, unlucky in love, delighted to compose poetry, and...
Horace’s “The Country Mouse and the City Mouse”

Horace’s “The Country Mouse and the City Mouse”

Horace’s delights in a rustic country dinner, rusticus cenae, the custom of which is linked to the Greek custom of eranos, a dinner to which each guest contributes something. It was an old custom in Horace’s time, and soon faded. It was apparently unknown to the...
Virgil’s Aeneid and the Trojans’ First Meal in Latium

Virgil’s Aeneid and the Trojans’ First Meal in Latium

Virgil’s Aeneid tells the story that when Aeneas and his troop landed in Latium, they were so hungry they ate the thick slices of stale bread that served as trenchers. This may seem insignificant, but according to prophecy this meant they had reached the place to...