Gustave Courbet’s  Le Repas de Chasse  (1858)

Gustave Courbet’s Le Repas de Chasse (1858)

Courbet hugely enjoyed the hunt, and at the center of Le Repas de Chasse, he painted himself nearly life-size. Believing himself an embodiment of the hunter, who he considered embodying the spirit of liberty, “un homme libre,” he was proud of his skill, once bragging...
Edward Langley’s The Master of Game (1413)

Edward Langley’s The Master of Game (1413)

When Edward Langley, 2nd Duke of York, translated Gaston’s The Book of the Hunt (1389) into English in 1413, French was still the language of the Court and elsewhere. Whatever Edward had in mind, the translation the signaled the linguistic shift in English society,...
Nicolas Lancret’s Picnic after the Hunt (1735/40)

Nicolas Lancret’s Picnic after the Hunt (1735/40)

Because the scene is obviously a picnic, the National Gallery of Art’s title The Picnic after the Hunt is apt. But Lancret, whose language was French, would not have used pique-nique because it refers to an indoor dinner. More likely, he would have titled un repas de...
Gaston III, Count of Foix’s Book of the Hunt (1389)

Gaston III, Count of Foix’s Book of the Hunt (1389)

*Gaston III, Count of Foix, was nicknamed Phoebus because of his golden hair. He was a second-tier noble whose domain was Béarn, bordering the Pyrenees in southwestern France. Gaston was immensely rich, unlucky in love, delighted to compose poetry, and passionate...